Course start: Tuesday 30/3/10, kl. 10–12 at Seminarierum 1–2

Teacher: Katariina Kyrölä
katariina.kyrola@mail.film.su.se

To take Lorde’s thought to the field of media studies, our ability to face differences is crucially shaped by inclusions and exclusions in the media. In today’s moving image culture, issues such as multiculturalism, ethnic and racial tolerance, and the divide between the “west” and the “third world” are as acute as ever. Despite the wide-reaching media visibility and success of figures like Barack Obama, Oprah Winfrey, or Jennifer Lopez, western media is still overwhelmingly dominated by white men and women. Legacies of colonial stereotypes and imagery are visible, for instance, in black or Latina women’s shaking bottoms on MTV, in the continuing reluctance for interracial romance in Hollywood, and in fashion trends with “ethnic flavor”. Whiteness in the media – and in academic research – seems strangely invisible, representing the generic human, whereas non-whiteness easily stands out and represents specificities or “added spice”.

In postcolonial media studies, these and many other tendencies are critically examined. However, it is not enough to pose the question how to look but also where to look. The course asks how hierarchical differences across and within changing national, ethnic and racialized locations are produced and potentially dislodged in western and non-western media imageries. Through various examples from Hollywood to Sweden, from Asia to Latin America, from Mammy in Gone with the Wind to a nameless Muslim woman, we will explore how “race”, ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality intertwine and become valued in forms and subject matters of audiovisual narration.

In addition to postcolonial theory, the course deals with related and overlapping fields of thought, such as critical studies of whiteness, intersectional and queer theory, black feminist thought, and scholarship on transnationality and diaspora, which all share an interest in challenging hegemonic ways of knowing and seeing.

Along with media viewings, the course consists of lectures (in English), discussions (in English), small writing assignments and a home exam (in English or in Swedish).

Course start: Tuesday 30/3/10, kl. 10–12 at Seminarierum 1–2

Teacher: Katariina Kyrölä
katariina.kyrola@utu.fi

Course description:

In today’s moving image culture, issues such as multiculturalism, transnationalism, ethnic and racial tolerance, and the divide between the “west” and the “third world” are as acute as ever. Postcolonial Perspectives on Audiovisual Media asks how hierarchical differences across and within changing national, ethnic and racialized locations are produced and potentially dislodged in western and non-western media imageries. Through various examples from Hollywood to Sweden, from Asia to Latin America, from cyberspace to music videos, from legacies of colonial stereotypes to new forms of ethnic imagery, we will explore how “race”, ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality intertwine and become valued.

The course introduces postcoloniality and multiculturalism as theoretical frameworks as well as audiovisual fields and conditions of consumption which tackle with multiple, overlapping differences. The main focus is on questions of visibility and privilege, marginalization and tolerance which relate postcolonial (media) theory to feminist studies.

Study goals:

After the course, students are expected to be able to
- Understand and critically reflect on introduced central concepts and frameworks, such as postcoloniality, multiculturalism, transnationalism, “third world cinema”, difference, otherness, “race”, ethnicity, gender, and whiteness.
- Describe and evaluate contemporary challenges in postcolonial media studies.
- Contextualize academic debates and moving image material within broader frameworks of postcolonial history, cultural location and research.
- Apply learned concepts and approaches to independent critical analysis of moving image or other related material.

Assessment, examination and grading:

During the course, students will read the texts in the obligatory course reading list (reading assignments for each week will be given) and participate in lectures, seminar discussions and film/television viewings. They should be able to critically discuss themes and questions in the reading and lecture material and apply these discussions to analysis of the viewings. In addition to active participation, the course will be examined through a combination of small writing assignments on reading material/viewings and a home exam in which they can apply concepts and/or approaches on moving image material of their choosing.

a. The viewing of film, television and other media throughout the programme is mandatory and will be assessed on par with course literature. Home exams and other written assignments should be word processed and students should present them electronically. Genuine Text may be used to protect against plagiarism. Cases of suspected cheating, such as plagiarism, will be reported to the University’s Disciplinary Committee by the departmental chair or director of studies. 


b. Grades are awarded on a seven-point assessment scale:
A = Excellent 

B = Very good 

C = Good
D = Satisfactory 

E = Poor
Fx = Inadequate 

F = Unacceptable

c. Assessment criteria will be circulated at the start of the course. 


d. The final grade for the whole course must be at least E to pass. 


e. Students who fail a course with grade Fx or F have the right to undertake four additional assessments, so long as courses continue to run, to achieve a pass grade. Students who receive grade E cannot repeat an assessment in order to attain a higher grade. Students who receive grade Fx or F for a course on two occasions by one and the same examiner have the right to request that another examiner be appointed to consider the grade, if there is no particular reason that excludes such action. A formal request concerning change of examiner shall be submitted to the departmental board.

Course literature

Course books:

Shohat, Ella and Stam, Robert. Unthinking Eurocentrism: Multiculturalism and the Media. London New York: Routledge, 1994. (circa 360 p.)

Shohat, Ella Stam, Robert (eds.). Multiculturalism, Postcolonialiandty, and Transnational Media. Rutgers University Press, 2003. (circa 320 p.)

Online reading:

Ahmed, Sara. “Multiculturalism and the Promise of Happiness”. New Formations 63, 2008, 121–137. http://www.gold.ac.uk/media/ahmed1.pdf (17 p.)

Hester-Williams, Kim D. “NeoSlaves. Slavery, Freedom, and African American Apotheosis in Candyman, The Matrix, and The Green Mile”. Genders 40, 2004. http://www.genders.org/g40/g40_williams.html (19 p.)

Lesage, Julia. “Torture Documentaries”. Jump Cut 51, Spring 2009. http://www.ejumpcut.org/currentissue/TortureDocumentaries/text.html#1n (47 p.)

Leurdijk, Andra. “In search of common ground. Strategies of Multicultural Television Producers in Europe”. European Journal of Cultural Studies 9:1, 2006, 25–46. (22 p.) (available as E-journal)

MacDonald, Myra. “Muslim Women and the Veil. Problems of image and voice in media representations”. Feminist Media Studies 6:1, 2006, 7–23. (18 p.) (available as E-journal)

Moorti, Sujata. “Inflamed Passions. Fire, the Woman Question, and the Policing of Cultural Borders”. Genders 30, 2000. http://www.genders.org/g32/g32_moorti.html (24 p.)

Nakamura, Lisa. “Race In/For Cyberspace: Identity Tourism and Racial Passing on the Internet”, 1996. http://www.humanities.uci.edu/mposter/syllabi/readings/nakamura.html (8 p.)

Shaviro, Steve. “Supa Dupa Fly: Black Women as Cyborgs in Hip Hop Videos”. Quarterly Review of Film and Video, 22:2, 2005, 169–179. (11 p.) (available as E-journal)

Siapera, Eugenia. “Multiculturalism online: The internet and the dilemmas of multicultural politics”. European Journal of Cultural Studies 9:1, 2006, 5–24. (20 p.) (available as E-journal)

(altogether 866 p.)

Schedule

DATUM TID PLATS HÄNDELSE
30/3 Kl. 10-12 Seminarierum 1-2 Start-up lecture
30/3 Kl. 13-15:30 Bio Mauritz Screening
1/4 Kl. 13-15 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion
6/4 Kl. 13-15 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion
6/4 Kl. 15-17 F-salen Screening
13/4 Kl. 10-12 Seminarierum 1-2? Lecture/discussion
13/4 Kl. 13-15 KB Audiovisuella medier? Screening
15/4 Kl. 10-12 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion
20/4 Kl. 13-15 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion
22/4 Kl. 10-13 KB Audiovisuella medier Screening
22/4 Kl. 14-16 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion
28/4 Kl. 13-15 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion
28/4 Kl. 15-17 F-salen Screening
29/4 Kl. 13-15 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion
4/5 Kl. 10-12 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion
4/5 Kl. 13-15 F-salen Screening
10/5 Kl. 13-17 Bio Mauritz Screening
11/5 Kl. 13-15 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion
18/5 Kl. 10-12 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion
18/5 Kl. 13-15 KB Audiovisuella medier Screening
20/5 Kl. 10-12 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion
25/5 Kl. 11-12 KB Audiovisuella medier Screening
25/5 Kl. 13-15 Seminarierum 1-2 Lecture/discussion

APPLICATION AND SYLLABUS


Apply via this link and find Course Syllabus